Kampfgruppe Khairul

with Khairul Effendy (Battlefront Malaysia)

When I first saw the units available in this box I just knew I had to paint it up.

5 Panzer IVs, 2 Tigers, 3 StuGs, an Armoured Panzergrenadier platoon, 2 8.8 guns and a Nebelwefer battery.  Did I mention 2 Tigers… This box has a good mix of everything, the best Late War Starter Force in my opinion.

I decided to try something different when painting this force. I wanted it to immediately catch attention by using brighter colours, less emphasis on realism but more on a cartoony effect. I wanted it to pop when it’s on the table waiting to annihilate my opponents with style.

To achieve this I decided not to use any washes on the vehicles. And to brighten the models I carefully painted lines on surface edges. I Am very happy with how everything turned up.

I present to you Kampfgruppe Khairul!

Panzer IV Tank Company HQ
X 2 Panzer IV

Panzer IV Tank Platoon
X 4 Panzer IV.

The Starter Box comes with only 3 panzer IVs. I added another one to complete a 50 points list.

HQ of 2 panzer IVs, a platoon of 4 panzer IVs and 3 StuGs 7.5cm completes a 50 points list of nine teams shooting at AT9 and FP 3+. Show me those Shermans!!

StuG Assault Gun Platoon
X 3 Stug (7.5cm)

Tiger Tank Platoon
X 2 Tiger

Support unit – 8.8cm Heavy AA Platoon
X 2 8.8cm AA gun

Support unit – 15cm Nebelwerfer Battery
X 3 15cm Nebelwerfer

The force so far.

All that’s left is to paint the 10 infantry teams and 4 half-tracks.

Wittman’s Last Day

with Chris Townley (Battlefront NZ)

Like many Flames Of War players, I have quite an interest in the German Big Cats (Tigers, Panthers and so on) and have featured them in many of my armies. I cannot put my finger on the primary reason for my love of these tanks, but it is probably a combination of factors including in-game performance, and real-world respect.

With the D-Day: German book I found myself really wanting to build a few lists (nothing like new plastic kits passing across your desk to get you excited) but thanks to my Big Four commitments I was reluctant to dive down the rabbit hole – that was until inspiration hit me! I have a box of partially assembled Tigers sitting in the man-cave (okay, garage) at home that I started and then stopped after being distracted by something else shiny!

Five Reasons I Love The New Plastic Tiger…

Now, you cannot think about Tigers without thinking about Michael Wittmann and his exploits in Normandy. His actions have become somewhat legendary amongst the modelling and gaming communities. We even made a specific model for him back in the day (see the article here…)

I’m drawn to building a list around him for a few different reasons;

  1. I can slowly build an all-Tiger force of seven (or eight) vehicles
  2. Because it is a compact force, I can really go to town on the models
  3. He faced off against the British and Canadian forces in Normandy and was probably killed in an engagement with a Firefly tank (AT 14 beats Front Armour 9 all day!). Having just finished my Firefly tanks it could make for a good match up.
  4. It can be fun to build a specific real-world force, based on actual events, with no plans to growing the project outside its specific scope. Thanks to the internet I can actually track down all the tank numbers and details for the tanks that he rolled out with on that fateful day. 

So what’s my plan? First step, start building the army. I am going to be heavily inspired by Blake’s outstanding article over on the Flames Of War site – stop reading this now, click this link and come back – which is overflowing with great ideas.

Next, do a little reading and figure out a how to paint them.

Lastly, find someone in the Studio to play a game against and hit them with seven Tigers and a small pile of Tiger Ace Command Cards! 

Gareth’s Panzergrenadiers

with Gareth Richards (Battlefront UK)

It is had been a while since I last painted a German Army for Late War, my first being a Herman Goering from 3rd Edition. With D-Day: German‘s launch, I’m excited to start a new German army. I like to try and get my armies painted quickly and on the table so that I can get games played and then tweak my list as I go along. With my play style I like a balanced force that allows me to have some flexibility. Reading through the new D-Day: German book I settled on the Armoured Panzergrenadiers.

I spent a couple of afternoons hunting through the web to find German units in Normandy and found myself drawn to the 21st Panzer Division. I wrote a few lists and looked at Panthers and Tigers, but these did not really suit my need for a flexible army. With that in mind I hit the book again and the web and settled on 125th Panzer Grenadier Regiment commanded by Major Hans von Luck.
In my army I started with my core choices and went with full strength Panzergrendier platoons with added Panzerfausts. They will either rush forward to take the objectives, dismounting and then digging in to make them difficult to shift off the objective, or be a mobile assault force against other enemy infantry.

I also want to make sure that I can pin enemy infantry down and have the ability to take out lightly-armoured enemy vehicles so I have chosen a battery of 6 Hummels, now this does take up a large part of my army points, I am then adding some a couple of Tigers to either refuse a flank or go enemy tank hunting trying to ensure that I can get on the flanks to make the task easier.

To round out my points I have taken some 7.5cm armoured guns and a couple of pumas to spearhead them onto the flanks and again cause my opponent to maybe alter their battleplan

I think this is a nicely balanced force that will give me some good options during the Hobby League, but I can also easily swap out anything that does feel right or not working well in the game.

My biggest challenge is getting this army painted is my infantry as it has never been one of my strong points, with my figures always coming across too dark and blending with the bases, so I am going to try working off a white undercoat and see if that brightens up the paint scheme.

A Tale of Two Tigers

Chris has already mentioned in his article how much of an exceptional resource Blake’s Tale of Two Tigers series of articles is.

Even so, it’s worth repeating.

Check out Blake’s series here…

 

In it, he takes you through a series of techniques and methods to reproduce truly characterful Tiger tanks, which he uses to represent the famous Wittman Tigers.

There’s a lot to learn, so make sure you have the article bookmarked if you’re planning to put together your own Tiger-based list… Although there’s nothing to say you couldn’t transfer some of the skills to our new Panther kit…

 

 

 

 

Brian’s Greyhounds

with Brian, BF US

When playing Germans I often find it difficult to bring the big and shiny toys, while having a force that is substantial enough to cover all of the bare necessities. The force I’ve come up with allows me to have at least one thing for every kind of scenario I expect to face on the table.

The Panzergrenadiers are there to hold objectives, or assault enemy objectives. The Armored Mortars are for a smoke screen or pinning enemy infantry. The Armored Gun platoon is for ambushing and killing medium and light armor. The AA is rather self explanatory, but could easily be pressed into service killing light vehicles or infantry.
I brought the Tigers because they can handle almost any tanks that they come across, and can be put in reserve to cover my 40 point requirement. The Sdkfz 250s are for Spearheads and emergency AA. The Sdkz 234 7.5cms add in a little extra pizzazz.

The card that makes this all possible is the 116 th Panzer Division card. For the steep discount of -2 points per unit in my primary formation, I take a hit to both Last Stand, and Tactics, a sacrifice I’m willing to make as it saves me 14 points overall. This discount from this card pays for one of my two Panzergrenadier Platoons!

Honestly I took this formation for only two reasons, to get some recon assets, but more importantly to get the Sdkfz 234 7.5cm Heavy Scout Platoon! They’re just too cool to pass up, they’re Pumas but better because they have a better Firepower rating, as well as HEAT.

I wouldn’t possibly be able to pass on taking a Firefly, everyone knows that
the best Allied tanks are driven by Germans after all!

Chris Builds a D-Day: German Tournament List

with Chris Potter (Battlefront UK)

Normally when I put together a list, there is an aesthetic or historical reason behind it and I am able to give (at length) reasons why I have chosen that Army. Alas, and much to the relief of my wife, this time is a little different for the German D-Day book. I won’t be waxing lyrical about specific units or
historical formations. Instead I have actually approached the book from a gamer’s point of view, albeit with some restrictions.
I started as I always do with writing my ideal list, regardless of points, for the units I have seen in the book that I want in my army. This time, it was the turn of copious amounts of Panzer IV, Panthers, and troops to enter the fray and get my appetite whet. One thing to bear in mind with the German Book for D-Day is that there are a lot of options for units. The first thing a player will notice is, similar to Fortress Europe, you can take multiple tank formations of Tigers and the bigger tanks that the Germans employed in the later stages of 1944.
This poses an issue as to take lots of tanks, costs lots of points. Hence my decision to go with Panzer IV, that ubiquitous workhorse of the Heer, in quantity with some elite tanks attached. Hello Panthers! The tracks, the guns, the turrets… I knew I had to take some Panthers to show the American 76mm who was boss of the battlefield. Now with the German D-Day book there is another variant of the Panther – The Panther A.

The key difference between this and the Panther G, which most people will know, is the application of Zimmerit on the hull and turret. And the new plastic kit delivers in bucket loads.

Sculpted directly on the plastic is the Zimmerit and it looks seriously good. To round off my force, from a gaming perspective, I needed some troops.

So I add some Panzergrenadiers, sadly bereft of their Halftracks so as to squeeze them into the army at full stand sized companies. Plus by doing this I was able to keep the model count low.
Time is money and having already committed to building a 100pt army of US Paras, with their lovely high model count, for the UK Office Hobby League, I wanted as few stands and tanks to paint as possible. Then it was time to trim the list. First out were extra Panzers and Panthers to maintain an equilibrium in points so as to make sure any one formation wasn’t too high, but also so I could squeeze in a second formation of troops to hold and contest objectives, and be a pivot for my tanks to run off. I eventually managed to come up with this list:
Now to decide on a paint scheme!

Painting Tropical Fallschirmjäger

with Victor Pesch (Battlefront NZ)

I’m currently starting a new force from D-Day: German, the Fallschirmjäger StuG Assault Gun Company. Instead of having it themed for Normandy, I’m using it to represent Fallschirmjäger & StuGs in the Italian Campaign.

Here’s how I’m painting the new Late-War Plastic Fallschirmjäger figures for my Italy themed platoon in tropical uniforms.

Basecoat

First I primed the figures with a black rattle can. Then to speed things up I airbrushed the figures Khaki. This gave me a light base colour to work over rather than trying to paint beige / tan over the black primer. It also meant I could drybrush on the German Camo Beige for the smocks to create initial shading. Then I simply block painted all the items, trying to be as neat as possible.

Wash

This step is simple as I just cover the entire figure with Black Wash. This darkens everything quite a lot, but I like the way it defines all the elements. It also makes it easy to re highlight with the same base colours without having to find lighter shades.

Highlights

As mentioned above, I generally go back with the base colours and highlight the raised surfaces of everything. Then I sometimes do a second highlight with a different colour on some items.

See below for all the colours I used, but feel free to experiment with your own:

Quick Tip- Worn Leather

A simple way to achieve a worn leather look on straps and bags is to gently dab the edges with a lighter colour. It’s like an edge highlight but the dabbing action gives it a more irregular, worn look.

Now that I’ve figured out my colour choices, I’ve got a lot more figures to paint, and also all the StuGs! I think the platoon will look quite interesting with it’s mix of yellow and field grey pants, and the yellow un covered helmets.

Speaking of uncovered helmets, one last tip: Sponge on some German grey to show the yellow paint chipping off.

 

The Brand New PLASTIC Panther

with Kai Tun (Battlefront Malaysia)

Check out the Panther in the Online Store…

One of the most exciting kit releases coming with D-Day: German is the Panther A with Zimmerit in all plastic. Here, Kai (BF Malaysia) takes us through a brief overview of the Panther tank and the brand new Panther kit.

The Tank
The Panzer V ‘Panther’ Ausf. A was the second production type of the formidable German medium tank. Many of the reliability issues of the prior Ausf. D, such as engine and transmission problems, were rectified by the time the Panther A faced the Allied invasion in the villages of Normandy.
With a potent 7.5cm KwK 42 L/70 gun and 80mm of sloped frontal armour, it was superior to any individual tank the Americans and British could bring to bear. At the same time, the Panther had superior manoeuvrability compared with the Tiger tank. 2,200 Panther A tanks were built, making it the second-most numerous Panther variant after the Ausf. G. The Panther A saw service on the Eastern Front, as well as in Normandy and Italy, so you’ll
have plenty of opportunities to field – or face – this deadly steel beast.

View from the Factory
The plastic Panther A model has been a long time coming! Needless to say, several members of our Malaysian team were quite happy to be the first hobbyists in the world to build this model.

The new Panther A kit has been designed to use the same track sprue that goes with our older Panther G model. Some of the parts on the track sprue – like the exhaust pipes and the ball-mounted hull MG with Zimmerit – have just been waiting all these years to come together in an all- plastic kit.

Our early assembly tests at the factory helped to ensure that all parts from both old and new sprues fit perfectly. Do note that early Panther A tanks were equipped with a pair of vertical exhaust pipes at the rear of the tank, but later production tanks had a triple pipe coming out of the left side instead of the normal single left pipe, to help with cooling.

 

This could be a great way to distinguish some Panther A tanks in the Late-War period as newly-arrived replacements! The new hull and turret have been modelled with the Panther A’s Zimmerit anti-mine paste, giving it a very distinctive textured look compared with our Panther G model. Anticipating that Soviet infantry would begin using magnetic anti-tank mines, the Germans began applying the paste to new Panther A tanks in the factory in late 1943 – but ultimately abandoned the practice by September 1944.